Thursday, July 20, 2017

Hostage to the Revolution by Diane Scott Lewis



PUBLISHER'S BLURB

Sequel to Escape the Revolution. In 1796, ruined countess Bettina Jonquiere leaves England after the reported drowning of her lover, Everett. In New Orleans she struggles to establish a new life for her children. Soon a ruthless Frenchman demands the money stolen by her father at the start of the French Revolution.

Bettina is forced on a dangerous mission to France to recover the funds. She unravels dark family secrets, but will she find the man she lost as well?


REVIEW

Diane Scott Lewis’ sequel to Escape The Revlution opens with Bettina Jonquiere, leaving England aboard ship bound for the Americas with her children, Christian and Genevre, Everett’s nephew Frederick and her servant. In New Orleans she struggles to establish a new life for her children. With no idea whether Everett is still alive, Bettina must decides to go in search of her mother who fled to Louisiana after the horrors of the French Revolution.

Her reunion with her mother is not quite what she imagined, as the widowed countess is about to marry again to a man Bettina takes an immediate dislike to.

The political situation in the south changes and before long, Bettina as a fugitive aristocrat is under threat yet again, and it doesn’t help that her British passport is a fake.  A ruthless Frenchman demands the money stolen by her father at the start of the French Revolution and convinced she knows where the money is hidden, he kidnaps Bettina and takes her to France.

However Bettina is nothing if not resourceful and she manages to turn the situation to her own advantage and goes in search of the only man she will ever love.

Ms Scott Lewis has drawn a brave and determined heroine in Bettina, who allows nothing to get in her way of living the way she wants to. The author’s descriptions of the tropical climate of Louisiana’s cloying humid heat and mosquitoes was very realistic.

Fans of Ms Scott Lewis’ novels will not be disappointed with this latest offering.


EDITORIAL REVIEWS

...wonderfully researched and the reader is taken right into the drawing rooms, kitchens and taverns of the dark days of late eighteenth century England." - Historical Novels Reviews blog

“Diane Scott Lewis writes with a fresh, clear voice, keeping all the threads of betrayal, intrigue and lies from becoming tangled as she weaves them into her story”- The Muse

A love story steeped in secrets and set against the backdrop of the French Revolution, ... woven with the right amount of fact as well as fiction, each balancing the other in a perfect harmony. Diane Scott Lewis has the power of descriptive writing that makes readers feel as though they are traveling alongside Bettina as she faces the unknown. Simply brilliant. Historical Novel Society


Anita Davison
Author of The Flora Maguire Mysteries from Aria Fiction