Monday, April 24, 2017

The Confessions of Young Nero by Margaret George


The New York Times bestselling and legendary author of Helen of Troy and Elizabeth I now turns her gaze on Emperor Nero, one of the most notorious and misunderstood figures in history.

Built on the backs of those who fell before it, Julius Caesar’s imperial dynasty is only as strong as the next person who seeks to control it. In the Roman Empire no one is safe from the sting of betrayal: man, woman—or child.
 
As a boy, Nero’s royal heritage becomes a threat to his very life, first when the mad emperor Caligula tries to drown him, then when his great aunt attempts to secure her own son’s inheritance. Faced with shocking acts of treachery, young Nero is dealt a harsh lesson: it is better to be cruel than dead.
 
While Nero idealizes the artistic and athletic principles of Greece, his very survival rests on his ability to navigate the sea of vipers that is Rome. The most lethal of all is his own mother, a cold-blooded woman whose singular goal is to control the empire. With cunning and poison, the obstacles fall one by one. But as Agrippina’s machinations earn her son a title he is both tempted and terrified to assume, Nero’s determination to escape her thrall will shape him into the man he was fated to become—an Emperor who became legendary.
 
With impeccable research and captivating prose, The Confessions of Young Nero is the story of a boy’s ruthless ascension to the throne. Detailing his journey from innocent youth to infamous ruler, it is an epic tale of the lengths to which man will go in the ultimate quest for power and survival.

REVIEW

What was Emperor Nero really like? Was he as ruthless and murderous as history has said he was? Margaret George delves deep into history and breathes life into a man of legend? 

Margaret George has long been one of my favourite authors. Her books have always entertained me from start to finish and The Confessions of Young Nero is no exception. Although Nero never aspired to be as ruthless as Caligula or his mother Agrippa, he soon finds himself ascending the Roman throne. Alone he must learn whom to trust and whom to consider an enemy. This novel begins when he is a young boy and covers his life until early middle age. 

History has painted Nero as villainous and treacherous, however Margaret George has also provided a vision of his good qualities too, a difficult balance to strike against Ancient Rome's penchant for lurid sex, violence, brutal executions, and rampant poisonings, among a host of other vile vices. 

Like all biographical novels, not every chapter can be considered a gripper. Rather, I found the story to be a strong and steady climb to the ending, a reading journey that held my interest and fascinated me with an abundance of historical details. Another winning novel by a very talented author.